Although “no late work” is my official policy…

Recently, a teacher wrote to us with a fantastic question, so we asked three great thinkers in the field of assessment how they might answer it. Here’s the question:

I am intrigued by the concept of not discounting grades for late work. While I understand, on a basic level, the intent being to not discourage learning, shouldn’t there still be some expectations of personal responsibility? One of the reasons students don’t get grades for late work is that late work infringes on my time by requiring me to take extra time to assess the work. Trying to assess that work in a timely manner makes me rushed in my feedback. Therefore the quality of the feedback is diminished if the work is submitted late, and I expect that they should be able to submit most work on time. Now, although “no late work” is my official policy, all someone has to do is to contact me, give me *any* excuse (just about), and I allow them to turn it in, because I recognize that my students are people and things get in the way. So, can I still give reduced points/zeroes for late work?

This question is one that many teachers have had as they move forward with assessing their assessment practices. We asked a few of the amazing people we work with here at ATI and they were kind enough to share their thoughts on the subject with us.

Author and presenter Cassandra Erkens writes:

It is always important to teach responsibility in schools, but the way it’s often managed, refusing or discounting points for late work, has missed the mark of actually teaching responsibility on too many fronts. First, this strategy actually teaches the opposite of responsibility. In the adult world, when someone misses a critical time line, he or she demonstrates responsibility by fixing the problem created by the tardiness; it would be considered irresponsible to walk away from it.  Discounting points or refusing to accept late work encourages learners to act irresponsibly and walk away from the opportunity to learn. Responsible learners do the work; they do not opt out.  Second, the message sent by such a practice is that timeliness is more important than learning. In essence, teachers devalue their own assessments when they suggest that what they wanted the learner to learn no longer matters since the timeline was missed.  In this way, compliance trumps learning.  The primary responsibility of students in schools is learning – it is, after all, why the learners are there.  Finally, teaching responsibility requires modeling responsibility.  Teachers model responsibility by requiring evidence of learning so they can offer feedback and provide support to ensure student success.  They teach perseverance, commitment, and precision when they require evidence of learning first and foremost.

Managing late work without penalizing scores might seem overwhelming, but teachers across North America are discovering and employing strategies to increase the responsibility of their learners without using grades to punish or reward learning instead of a tool meant to reflect learning. In many classrooms, homework is not graded, but it is required.  Students must use the results from their homework to make instructional decisions on what they require next in their progression of learning.  They track their results and work to gather the evidence that will prove their readiness for upcoming assessments.  In these classrooms, teachers report that there is actually an increase in student motivation and productivity.  More students are turning in more work with consistency.  The gentle switch from doing work to receive/avoid something to doing work to learn something reframes the overall process for both the teacher and the student.  The quality practices of formative assessment can give teachers the necessary strategies and tools to increase student responsibility in their classrooms.

Myron Dueck added these words of wisdom:

We make the assumption that by reducing grades for late work we are somehow enhancing or supporting ‘personal responsibility’.  This can be a misguided notion. My first response would be to ask a simple question: what do you want your grades to reflect?  Perhaps this question might be adjusted to: what are you asked to grade?  In the case of the second question, every jurisdiction I have encountered asks teachers to grade by a set of learning standards.  Therefore, teachers should want to grade the extent to which their students meet the prescribed learning outcomes. Whether you use zeros or late deductions, these ‘consequences’ will ultimately obscure whatever grading has already occurred.  Therefore, I have a pretty simple set of guidelines that I use to determine the effectiveness of grade-based student consequences:

  1. Does the consequence serve to achieve my ultimate goal?
  2. Does the student care about the consequence?
  3. Does the student have complete control over the variables associated with the task?

I used to use both lates and zeros in my grade book, but these three conditions caused me to abandon this practice.  Lates and zeros did not achieve my ultimate goal of grading according to learning outcomes.  In many cases, students proved they did not care as they willingly accepted the punitive actions, or in some cases actually prefered a zero to actually getting the work done.  Lastly, I found that many students were not in control of the variables that led to successful homework or assignment completiton.  Poverty, learning gaps, drug and alcohol issues, and mandatory work requirements were just a few of the barriers many students face. These factors may render it impossible for these students to complete homework. Adding a punitive “grade” to that challenge would only further diminish their ability to learn.

Ken Mattingly has this advice to give:

Academic grades should be a reflection of academic achievement.  When we discount an academic grade due to behavioral problems, it results in a skewed picture of student performance.  I see the real issue here being student accountability for completing the work, and I share your frustration with this issue.  I think there are two questions we need to ask before continuing.  First, are all students aware that they can get additional time?  Second, could there be other consequences for late work besides the score or grade?

Hopefully the answer to the first is yes, and all students are on even footing.  If not, they should be made aware of this opportunity and of how to ask for the time.  After all, as adults don’t our employers expect us to do the same if we need additional time?  This would be a great opportunity to begin to embed this life lesson.

As for the second question, there are always behavior consequences that can be applied to students who turn in late work.  It can be the loss of privileges, such as lunch or break time with friends.  It could be attending afterschool extended services.  It could even be receiving a corrective action plan that provides structure and timelines for completion of the work.  Each of these would be a way to address the underlying behavioral problem without impacting the academic assessment.

And Tom Schimmer has an entire blog post of his own on the subject which can be found here:

http://tomschimmer.com/2011/02/21/enough-with-the-late-penalties/

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4 responses to “Although “no late work” is my official policy…

  1. I do appreciate the replies. But either I missed an address to the teacher’s time, or it was not directly commented on. My sympathy with the original question/statement is balanced by my agreement that I don’t want to obscure the learning by taking points for tardiness. I don’t have an answer, but I would love to read some! Thank you for hosting the conversation!

    • Hi Brian – The question about teacher time is an important one that can’t be ignored. In order for any new practice to be successful long-term we need sustainable routines for teachers, otherwise we risk “burnout.” No penalties doesn’t mean no deadlines, however, when the deadlines are missed we need both an individual response and a “system” response in order to make sure that students are as current as possible. Some quick points…I’ll try to be brief.

      1) Distinguish between “can’t do” and “won’t do” issues. A “can’t do” means the student actually doesn’t fully understand what to do to complete the work. A “won’t do” is necessarily outright refusal, however, it does mean the student knows what to do but hasn’t done it. Each one of those requires a slightly different response.

      2) In the schools I’ve worked in we set an unwritten guideline of two weeks. That meant that we wanted work to be missing for longer than two weeks (we actually preferred 1, but knew there will always be extenuating circumstances and/or the scope of what’s missing may take longer. Then look at how you facilitate that. “Won’t dos” need a place to go (AM/at lunch/PM) to complete the missing work. Who supervises, who confirms attendance, etc. are all “system” questions that Principals and teachers have to come together on.If they “no-show” then who gets the referral, is it a “code of conduct” issue, etc.

      3) “Can’t dos” need further instruction and, therefore, need a different response from the teacher.

      4) Ask yourself whether the missing “evidence” is necessary or whether the standard(s) addressed int he missing work will be addressed again very soon. I call this overlapping evidence. Taking a standards-0based approach means we look at “meeting standards” and not necessarily “getting everything done.” For example, missing homework could likely be covered on an upcoming quiz so it might not be necessary for students to complete all of the homework as you know you will be assessing the very same standards shortly after. The big question with missing work is this: “Is this piece of evidence necessary for me to accurately assess the student’s level of proficiency?” If yes, then you need it; if no, then move on.

      Anyway, I apologize for the long reply, however, you ask a very good question. If you wish to discuss this further, please email me and maybe we can arrange a Skype/FaceTime call to examine the specifics of your context. Cheers!

      Tom

  2. Here was my reply to my supervisor- a man that I appreciate on boptha personal and professional level:

    Interesting philosophical issue; I thought about this the whole commute home… and then some.

    Here’s the short version: you have to maintain neutral buoyancy; a judge has some leeway in deciding certain penalties, but the law is there to advise and guide him, is applied evenly, and is consistent.

    The long answer:

    I build redundancy into grading; Generally, no late HW is accepted- but even all zeros in HW is only 10% of your grade. (you can still get a 90 without doing a lick of HW according to policy… which is good.)

    But the quizzes are based on the HW- so you need to learn the lesson.

    If you miss a quiz, you’re exempt- doesn’t hurt, doesn’t help.
    But the tests are based on the quizzes, so you need to learn the answers.

    The test can ALWAYS be made up- in fact, I think this is not under our discretion. You can’t give a student a zero for missing a test, nor have I ever heard of a teacher doing that here.

    Projects are the “big picture” lessons you are talking about where the learning should take precedent over the grade, and I take a few points per day on late projects till they hit an “F” at which point they become a zero. Then I usually talk to the student about it, and we go from there as to details about if, how, and when it is going to be made up.

    But still, I BELIEVE it when a student gives me an excuse because they respect me. They’d be embarrassed to lie to me just like I’d be ashamed to lie to you.

    It’s a balancing act.

    And I believe that high school is MUCH tougher than “the real world” for ALL KIDS, but especially our students. People have it backwards… Our students have TWENTY minutes a day to throw a sandwich down their necks, zero free time, a huge campus to navigate, and I won’t even get into the socioeconomic issues. For many of them this is going to be the toughest time in their lives. They have no car (for 80-90% of their time here), none of the freedom that comes from being an adult- but lots of responsibility- all while trying to navigate a social scene I can’t imagine having to deal with… can you imagine having to grow up in a world of social media?!

    To sum: kids need and want consistency and rules, but we need to be flexible and compassionate.

    • (corrected my typo)

      Here was my reply to my supervisor- a man that I appreciate on both a personal and professional level:

      Interesting philosophical issue; I thought about this the whole commute home… and then some.

      Here’s the short version: you have to maintain neutral buoyancy; a judge has some leeway in deciding certain penalties, but the law is there to advise and guide him, is applied evenly, and is consistent.

      The long answer:

      I build redundancy into grading; Generally, no late HW is accepted- but even all zeros in HW is only 10% of your grade. (you can still get a 90 without doing a lick of HW according to policy… which is good.)

      But the quizzes are based on the HW- so you need to learn the lesson.

      If you miss a quiz, you’re exempt- doesn’t hurt, doesn’t help.
      But the tests are based on the quizzes, so you need to learn the answers.

      The test can ALWAYS be made up- in fact, I think this is not under our discretion. You can’t give a student a zero for missing a test, nor have I ever heard of a teacher doing that here.

      Projects are the “big picture” lessons you are talking about where the learning should take precedent over the grade, and I take a few points per day on late projects till they hit an “F” at which point they become a zero. Then I usually talk to the student about it, and we go from there as to details about if, how, and when it is going to be made up.

      But still, I BELIEVE it when a student gives me an excuse because they respect me. They’d be embarrassed to lie to me just like I’d be ashamed to lie to you.

      It’s a balancing act.

      And I believe that high school is MUCH tougher than “the real world” for ALL KIDS, but especially our students. People have it backwards… Our students have TWENTY minutes a day to throw a sandwich down their necks, zero free time, a huge campus to navigate, and I won’t even get into the socioeconomic issues. For many of them this is going to be the toughest time in their lives. They have no car (for 80-90% of their time here), none of the freedom that comes from being an adult- but lots of responsibility- all while trying to navigate a social scene I can’t imagine having to deal with… can you imagine having to grow up in a world of social media?!

      To sum: kids need and want consistency and rules, but we need to be flexible and compassionate.

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